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Reporting Harmful Non-Defamatory Google Reviews

It is generally difficult to convince a website to remove defamatory third-party content without a court order. If person A goes to a website and says person B’s statements about him or her are false, how does that website know whether person A is telling the truth? And, even so, how...

Removing Defamatory Statements From the Internet Using a Court Order

Most businesses and professionals defamed on the internet simply want the false content removed. Fortunately, there are a number of ways to obtain removal, one of which is through a court order. Websites and other entities do not want to be tasked with having to weigh the facts of any...

Internet Defamation and Anti-SLAPP Laws: A Look Back at the Washington Supreme Court’s 2015 Ruling Invalidating the State’s Anti-SLAPP Statute

In late May 2015, the Washington Supreme Court became the first state to find an anti-SLAPP statute unconstitutional, striking down the rule codified as RCW 4.24.525. At the time (and likely still today), free speech advocates expressed their disappointment in the ruling, believing that the state of Washington would leave...

Fla. Attorney Wins Judgment, Award of Damages for Online Defamation by Former Client

A Florida appellate court has affirmed a trial court’s judgment and award of $350,000 in damages in favor of a Florida attorney who claimed she had been defamed in online reviews. Ann-Marie Giustibelli, a South Florida family law attorney, had represented Copia Blake in a divorce proceeding against Peter Birzon...

Online Comments, Free Speech and Internet Defamation: News Outlets Challenged by Internet Commenters

On Nov. 12, 2015, The Montana Standard published an online editorial about forthcoming changes to its online commenting policy.  This might seem trivial outside of the readership for this newspaper from the fifth largest city in the 44th most populated U.S. state.  But beginning in late November, The Montana Standard’s...

Court: Defamation Plaintiff Must Provide Evidence to Unmask Unknown Avvo.com Poster

A Washington appellate court offered defamation plaintiffs a friendly reminder last week: if you want to unmask the identity of an unknown internet poster, you better present evidence to back up your defamation claims. In a July 6 opinion, the Court of Appeals of Washington ruled that a Florida attorney...

How to Remove False, Defamatory Glassdoor Reviews

Founded in 2007, Glassdoor.com is an online “career community” with a database consisting of several million company reviews, CEO ratings, salary reports, job interview reports and more.  But as both the Associated Press and the Wall Street Journal have phrased things – in articles published nearly three years apart –...

FTC Violations Prompt Man’s Ban from Operating ‘Revenge Porn’ Sites

On Thursday, Jan. 29, 2015, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) announced that a Colorado man will be banned–subject to final approval–from distributing nude photos and videos without the subjects’ consent.  This comes following an FTC investigation that resulted in allegations of two FTC Act violations.  According to the FTC complaint, Craig Brittain operated...

Businesses Should Create ‘Web Assets’ to Help Protect Against Online Reputation Attacks

Businesses are best equipped to handle online reputation attacks if they take steps upfront to protect their reputations; take preventative measures to try to thwart or limit attacks; and plan out how to address attacks if (or when) they really do occur. Considering today’s internet landscape and current U.S. laws (such...

Whitney Gibson to Lead 10/28 Webinar on Internet Defamation Removal Strategies, Techniques

Whitney Gibson will be leading an upcoming webinar: “How to Remove Defamation and Other Damaging Content from the Internet.”  The live webinar, hosted by Lorman, will take place Tuesday, Oct. 28 from 1:00 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. (ET). This webinar is primarily designed for attorneys, and it has been approved...